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Initiation process group

Happy International Project Managers Day! In honor of it, and because I’ve been very burned out at work, I took the day off. I made some progress reading into Chapter 3 of Mulcahy’s PMP Exam Prep, 6th edition.

The focus of this chapter is to review the project process groups and the activities in each one. The process groups are Initiating, Planning, Executing, Controlling and Monitoring, and Closing. In the book, she provides a table of all of the process groups, and the activities. I’m working on memorizing, or at least working out the overarching narrative of the project, for each one.

I’m writing out the steps in a spreadsheet that I can reach back to when necessary. I’m not going to post that here, because it’s fairly well copy-writed. What I will do is try to describe the process group’s narrative flow, so I can internalize it better.

Before a project gets into the initiating phase, the organization has already determined it’s strategies for what it wants to accomplish. It identifies a goal, and decides that to reach that goal, a project needs to be performed. A business case is developed for reaching the goal and documenting how that goal will further the organizational strategy.

Once the business case is finished, the project initiation can begin. The first step is to hiring a project manager. The project manager needs to first understand the culture of the organization and its structure, to determine how the project will be ultimately shaped. This goes back to the post about organizational structure (functional, matrixed, projectized). Coupled with this phase is also determining what the organization’s processes for projects are, and the history with similar projects  (Mulcahy 43).

Knowing this background information, the project manager can dig into the business case, viewing it from within the context of the organization. Sensing the scale of the business case, the project manager can also determine if the project will need to be divided into phases. When reading the business case, you can determine the initial requirements for the project and potential risks  (Mulcahy 43).

It’s important to note, that these requirements are still within the context of the organization’s strategies. So, instead of just focusing on ‘completing this system’, there are larger questions at stake, about other pieces of the strategy, including vendor selection, long-range plans that this system are a part of, etc. (Mulcahy 44).

From the requirements, measurable objectives become clear. These are the hows and whens of the project. No longer are we interested in ‘growing market share’, but in ‘growing market share by 20% through streamling Customer Relations’.

With measurable objectives come, a sense of the requirements, and an overview of the risks, a project charter can be built (Mulcahy 43). From the charter documents I’ve drafted, I can identify that the history of both this business case, and the company’s history with projects of this nature are included, as are 30,000 foot overviews of timelines and budgets. The business case may have identified these already. But, this charter is the first of the project documents.

And finally, there is the question of stakeholders. Mulcahy lists the identification of stakeholders, and developing a stakeholder management plan at the end of the phase, though she does identify that these steps don’t need to be in order (42-43). I disagree with keeping these at the end. Stakeholder identification is often included in the charter, based on the business case, and the initial requirements. Stakeholder buy-in can be critical for getting approval for the project charter, and for ensuring the project is properly supported and resourced. I would opt to include identifying stakeholders before completing the charter.

While she doesn’t identify it here, I would suggest that approval of the charter indicates the end to this phase.

Finally, this phase appears to be the most cut-and-dry, and the one that most seldom is returned to. I could be proven wrong, though.

 

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